International Journal of Zoology Studies

International Journal of Zoology Studies


International Journal of Zoology Studies
International Journal of Zoology Studies
Vol. 6, Issue 6 (2021)

Life history and reproductive biology of four estuarine mysid species in Sri Lanka


Neetha Nandanie Punchihewa

Mysids were collected at nine estuarine waters (Negombo, Chilaw, Bolgoda, Mundal, Puttalam, Kalpitiya, Arippuwa, Achchankulam and Mannar) during March 2012 to July 2013. Three common species, Mesopodopsis orientalis, Mesopodopsis zeylanica and Sirella srilankensis, and one rare species, Anisomysis srilankensis were studied. The common species were studied in detail. Their females predominated over males and breeding occurred throughout the year. A significant positive correlation existed in relation to the abundance of M. orientalis, brooding females with salinity, temperature, pH, and adult females with rainfall while males only had a positive correlation with salinity. The larger species, M. orientalis showed higher brood size and higher egg diameters than smaller species. Mesopodopsis zeylanica possessed more broods in low salinity than in hyper saline conditions. The opposite was true for M. orientalis and S. srilankensis. The smaller species, M. zeylanica had the longest incubation time compared to the larger species, M. orientalis and S. srilankensis. Maximum brood sizes recorded for M. zeylanica, M. orientalis, S. srilankensis and A. srilankensis were 13, 16, 15 and 7 respectively. Males were found to reach maturity at a smaller size than females. The longest incubation time of 7–8 days was shown by the smaller species M. zeylanica, while the larger species, M. orientalis and S. srilankensis it was 5–6 days and 6 days respectively. All species produced overlapping generations. S. srilankensis was able to produce 7–10 successive broods within its lifetime with a life span of nearly 3–4 months. M. zeylanica, and M. orientalis were able to produce five and six successive broods within their life span respectively, and they lived ≈ 3–4 months and ≈ 4–5 months respectively. Growth rate of S. srilankensis was found to be the highest in juvenile and sub-adult stages. Site specific differences of brood size for a particular species was mainly dependent on the salinity of the water body.
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How to cite this article:
Neetha Nandanie Punchihewa. Life history and reproductive biology of four estuarine mysid species in Sri Lanka. International Journal of Zoology Studies, Volume 6, Issue 6, 2021, Pages 14-21
International Journal of Zoology Studies International Journal of Zoology Studies